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IT Disasters

IT disasters come in many flavors. Here are some top examples from the past 15 years.

Going through the motions
The most embarrassing failure we cleaned up was when a well-known IT company had set up a high-end backup tape system for a local marketing company. This backup system had been in place for five years. The staff person in charge of backup had religiously been changing backup tapes daily for the entire five years. One day they had a failure of one of their servers and needed to get to the backup from the day before only to find out there were no backups on the tape. We were called in and discovered that all seven tapes in rotation had the “write-protect” tab on the tape set, so that nothing could be written to the tapes.

This was a multi-level failure, as the backup system was reporting in the logs that it couldn’t write to the disks, but no-one had given the person in charge of backups the instructions to check the logs, or had set up emailing the logs. Further, they had not instituted a quarterly check of the tapes to verify that a backup could be successfully pulled from the tapes. In addition, tapes need regular replacement, as they do wear out. Of course, at this company the tapes were far from worn out, in fact they had never actually been used – in five years. Five years that management thought they had robust back-up protection.

Nice Thieves
We got a phone call from a local medical device company early on a Sunday morning. There had been a break in at their office Friday night and the thieves had stolen ten computers, ten phones, one phone server, one camera system server and their business server. So, every shred of technology that their business depended on was gone. Ironically and luckily, the thieves ejected the backup tape from the server and left it sitting where the server had been.

The owner had been unable to get a hold of their IT company and asked us to get them going again. We immediately brought out 10 computers, a phone system and a server to get them operational again. We recovered their latest backup from the tape and had them fully operational again by start of business Monday morning. We worked with their insurance company to get their claim filed and ultimately set up a new system for them with both on-site and off-site backups, among many other improvements.

Heat Your Office with Bitcoin
We got a call from a large law firm who complained that pc’s were constantly slow and their in-house IT department was unable to figure out the cause. We started an investigation but it seemed the in-house IT staff was surreptitiously trying to hamper our investigation. Ultimately, we figured out that the IT staff was running a Bitcoin mining scheme on over 600 computers and servers. Interestingly, at the same time the company had been trying to figure out why their electric bills had spiked over the last number of months. It’s impressive how much power 600 computers running maxed out 24/7 will use, and how much heat they produce that causes the AC system to have to run full out too.

Running out of Space
We had a new client who complained that they were constantly adding server storage space and new servers which were quickly running out of storage space. Unsurprisingly, their IT staff was unhelpful in trying to get to the source of a fairly obvious and nefarious scheme. The staff were running an illegal movie sharing website on the companies servers and cloaking resources from the line of business applications to put it toward being able to share questionable content. Not only did elimination of this activity drastically speed up operations, it removed a legal liability from the company and allowed the mothballing of four servers. Also, they saved on three IT staff who clearly were providing the company a negative return on investment.

Where There is Smoke
One of our customers had a fire in their building overnight. I had never experienced the aftermath of a fire before and was stunned that while the fire itself had not done a lot of damage, the smoke and the water used to extinguish the fire did. You could open a filing cabinet in a part of the building well away from where the fire was, pull out two pieces of paper and there would be soot in between the papers. There was soot in and on everything. The next day we set up a network in an unaffected part of their building and brought in temporary computers, a phone system, and servers to get them going again. We coordinated with ATT to have their data and phone lines brought in to another point in the building. We spent many nights and weekends getting a disaster to a reasonable level of manageability so they could keep business going.

All of this to say, make sure your IT company and staff have thought through all of the ways that loss of your data or systems could affect your ability to even be in business after an unforeseen problem.

We are looking for a Technical Support Specialist – 4/25/2018

5/2/2018 – Position Filled

Technical Support Specialist
Proactive Networking – Carmel, IN 46032
$18 – $24 an hour – Full-time, Part-time

Proactive Networking is seeking an individual who is excited about technology and seeks to gain real world experience as an IT Professional. Candidates will receive the opportunity to work side-by-side with consultants with 15+ years experience working in IT.

This role will serve as one of the first points of contact for our customers and will work to ensure all communication to the customer happens in a timely fashion. Qualified candidates will display the ability to resolve the requests of the customer or schedule the task with an available colleague.

A successful candidate will display:

Cheerful disposition and customer first attitude
Strong organizational skills
Ability to learn and retain new tasks
Knack for explaining IT in layman’s terms
Excellent written and verbal Communication
Ability to keep detailed logs of work performed
Ability to manage a priority list

Job Types: Full-time, Part-time

Salary: $18.00 to $24.00 /hour

License or certification:

Driver’s License (Required)

Language:

English (Required)

Apply Here

What happened to the $100 laptop?

Back in 2008 I pre-ordered three of the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) $100 laptops for $250 each in their “Buy one, Give one” campaign. After much delay they came in. I gave two of them to two tech guys in our office. After playing with them for a day, we were all in agreement that they were junk and I sold them on eBay for about what I paid for them. The Verge has the back story on why the promise of One Laptop Per Child didn’t pay out as planned.
Article at The Verge

Springtime means thunderstorms

A lot of money is spent in data centers and offices to prevent lightning from getting into electronics. Lighning tends to be an afterthought at most people’s homes, even though lightning causes major damage to home electronics.

My neighbor had to replace every electronic component in his home a few years ago, including his garage door opener, doorbell, tv’s, dishwasher, and of course computers. I was lucky in that the same strike only took out my battery backup / surge protector, which had clearly done its job. My new house has a whole house lightning arrestor at the main on the outside of the house. These are generally available from your power company for a couple hundred dollars or for a few dollars a month. They aren’t foolproof as strikes can still get in through your cable line or phone line.

Best practice is still to unplug anything you don’t want zapped when there is a storm close by, but given that unplugging is not always practical, suppression equipment is a good and inexpensive insurance policy.

Duke Energy in Indiana offers full home surge protection here.

When your accountant gets hacked

Brian Krebs has an interesting article on what happens when your accountant gets hacked and doesn’t realize it.  Causes IRS problems for his accounting clients and still doesn’t realize the fact that he has been hacked is the cause of the problems.
Article at Krebs on Security

Automatically Mounting USB Passthrough Drives for Windows Backup in a Hyper-V VM

We recently have started deploying Hyper-V in addition to ESXI. One thing we immediately noticed was that USB passthrough was going to be a challenge. As we worked through the problem we found that we could pass a USB Hard Drive through, but as we rotated through the set, our disks did not reconnect. Immediately my mind turned to Powershell. “There must be a way”, I thought, “to remount these disks on the hypervisor before the backup tries to run.” Indeed I was right. With the release of Server 2012 Microsoft has added some great Powershell management cmdlets to manage both VMs and disks.

Below is the script that we have running just before the backup kicks off. Note that you will need to edit the serial numbers appropriately so you can mount your disks. I’m sure this will be able to be dolled up to include a dynamic approach to the controller location (we even batted around the idea of a dedicated backup SCSI controller on the machine). Pay specific attention to the Controller Number, Type and location and the VMName.

Note: As we have had this running for a while we have noticed that this script prevents the machine from starting up if the USB disk last mounted is not present. We are working on a solution to that problem.